Resiliency, Endings, Laughter and Scariness

In numerological terms 2016 is a 9 year – a year of closure and letting go of the past so that you can make room for the present and the future. Apparently unhelpful friends should be avoided and bad habits should be dropped. Study, contemplation and travel are meant to be favourable during this time.

It certainly has been a year of endings for me – some major life changes, challenges and endings did occur. If someone had told me 18 months ago what would happen in my life over the next 18 months I would have just laughed at them. I did study a bit – Quantum Energy Coaching (QEC), I had some wonderful bucket list holidays and have had plenty of time to contemplate as I seem to have lost the ability to sleep.

I have contemplated resiliency quite a bit. Rod Warner from the Building Reliance Group has done research on how people deal with adversity and in his article explains 7 Building Resiliency Principles.

  • Connect to your purpose and meaning in life
  • Use your unique strengths
  • Maintain perspective
  • Generate positive feelings
  • Be realistically optimistic
  • Persevere by being open minded and flexible
  • Reach out to others

I certainly have used these principles for myself and was doing pretty well – I have had a lot of fun restructuring my life, jumping out of my comfort zone, making decisions, and was feeling excited and positive about my future.

But then one change too many, in too short a time, happened and I ran out of emotional energy. In September my dad was diagnosed with cancer and has subsequently also had a very minor stroke due to the treatment he was having. I lost perspective, could generate no positive feelings, was not optimistic and had no idea who to reach out to. I hugely resisted it – in my mind my dad was meant to stay healthy to look after my mom who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s last year. I did not want to worry about two frail parents living in a different city. I did not want to have to go visit regularly and spend time in the retirement village with two people who are no longer who they used to be. I very selfishly just wanted to get on and live my newly restructured life.

But we do what we have to do, and in the process someone always comes along to support and impart very necessary information, we learn who to reach out to, we use our strengths, we persevere and we gain perspective.

I am still resisting the situation a bit but have explored what lessons I have learnt in the past few months. The first is that I have realised that I am not the reincarnation of Florence Nightingale. The second is that it is not a good idea to lose your temper (and have a rant about human decency and karma) with one of Gauteng’s large and corrupt traffic officers who is trying to intimidate you into paying a bribe. I had a couple of incidences with intruders on my property in the middle of the year and neither the traffic officer nor the intruders seemed to find me very scary. The third lesson is that it is absolutely vital to continue laughing, connect to your inner child, not to take yourself or life too seriously, and be grateful for all you have in your life.

I then looked for the positives in the situation – on my few trips up to Joburg I noticed wonderful and random acts of kindness and care between our different cultures. I was impressed by the care of the nurses, the concern of a young air steward who could see I was taking strain and every time he walked past me gave my shoulder a squeeze, I saw men helping women with suitcases, old people supporting each other, and I noticed a general sense of connectedness and warmth between strangers. It made me feel more positive about our wonderful country.

I wish you all a restful ending to 2016 – we have ten more days left to drop bad habits – and I need to find out how to increase my scariness factor.

Flourishing with TRE

In his article on Kicking the Stress and Trauma Bucket Before it Kicks You Richmond Heath speaks about how our bodies possess ancient wisdom and movements designed to recover from stress and trauma, and to move towards thriving during times of safety.

TRE (Tension and Trauma Release Exercises) is one of the most wonderful modalities I have come across and it enables the body to shift into a restorative mode. Please come and join me on my next 6 week course and learn how to use it by yourself at home.

6 WEEK TRE GROUP COURSE STARTING ON TUESDAY 6 SEPTEMBER IN CLAREMONT

We are all affected by stress – it is part of life.

Designed by David Berceli, TRE is a simple technique that helps your body release stress or tension that has accumulated from day-to-day life experiences, immediate or ongoing stressful situations, and traumatic life events. A set of simple exercises invokes a mild tremor which helps bring the nervous system back to a state of calm and balance. Once learned TRE is a gentle and effective self-healing tool.

Some of the reported benefits of TRE include:

  • Greater sense of calm and inner peace
  • Less anxiety and worry
  • Reduced pain
  • Improved sleep quality
  • Reduced symptoms of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)
  • Increased emotional resilience
  • Relief from chronic medical conditions
  • Release of muscular tension from exercise and sport
  • Increased mobility and flexibility
  • Increased spiritual connection

Date:  6 Sept – 11 Oct (every Tuesday for 6 weeks)

Cost:  R950 (paid upfront)

Time:  7.00pm to 8.15pm

Venue: Claremont

How Trauma Changes The Brain – join me on my next 6 week TRE course

In the following article Michele Rosenthal writes about how trauma affects the brain and how activating the parasympathetic nervous system shifts the body into restorative mode.

The Science Behind PTSD Symptoms: How Trauma Changes The Brain

TRE (Tension and Trauma Release Exercises) is one of the most wonderful modalities I have come across and it enables the body to shift into a restorative mode. Please come and join me on my next 6 week course and learn how to use it by yourself at home.

6 WEEK TRE GROUP COURSE STARTING ON TUESDAY 19 JANUARY IN CLAREMONT

We are all affected by stress and trauma – it is part of life.

Designed by David Berceli, TRE is a simple technique that helps your body release stress or tension that has accumulated from day-to-day life experiences, immediate or ongoing stressful situations, and traumatic life events. A set of simple exercises invokes a mild tremor which helps bring the nervous system back to a state of calm and balance. Once learned TRE is a gentle and effective self-healing tool.

Some of the reported benefits of TRE include:

  • Greater sense of calm and inner peace
  • Less anxiety and worry
  • Reduced pain
  • Improved sleep quality
  • Reduced symptoms of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)
  • Increased emotional resilience
  • Healing of old injuries
  • Relief from chronic medical conditions
  • Release of muscular tension from exercise and sport
  • Increased mobility and flexibility
  • Increased spiritual connection

Date:  19 Jan – 23 Feb (every Tuesday for 6 weeks)

Cost:  R95o (paid upfront)

Time:  6.30pm to 7.30pm

Venue: Claremont

 

Post Traumatic Growth

People often ask me how I manage to work with trauma, especially in this wonderful but violent country that we live in. Results of several studies show that trauma does not need to be shattering and debilitating and that most people are resilient and even grow in the wake of a trauma.

The Post Traumatic Growth Inventory developed by R Tedeschi and L Calhoun in 2006 measures positive outcomes reported by persons who have experienced traumatic events. These positive outcomes include:

  • new possibilities that have arisen from the trauma
  • improvement in relating to others
  • personal strength improvement
  • spiritual change
  • greater appreciation of life

In the video below Dr Megan McElheran speaks about how we need to stay engaged in both our inner world and the outer world so that we can begin healing from a trauma.